Samarpan
District Administration

A. Problem Analysis

 1. What was the problem before the implementation of the initiative?
Before the initiative, the first sign of any type of possible delay, disease, deficiency and disability in under 5 children (U5) was not being looked into at community level leading to late detection and loss of precious infant years. The poor level of awareness in society, coupled with the social stigma associated with disability made the case of early identification and intervention all the more challenging. The topic of identification and intervention was a new one for the Country and for the District Administration, requiring capacity building of officials. In addition, there was a serious gap in terms of resource such as trained professionals (audiometrist, clinical psychologist etc.), equipments and accessories required adding to the challenge. An overwhelming need to sensitize the elected public representatives, non-government organizations, media, government officials, grass root level functionaries and people at large, particularly women and vulnerable sections in society was felt. Apart from little knowledge and experience of early identification and intervention of disability, there was an additional challenge of weaving an inter-departmental and inter-sectoral programme tailor made to achieve the objective through convergence. This required planning, inter alia, for tools and ways of capacity building and regular monitoring, review and evaluation, screening evaluation and treatment etc.The main problem and issues which the district administration faced was lack of awareness and social stigma associated with disability in society. Disability neither recognizes caste, creed or race nor it makes a distinction between the poor or rich; it affects the entire society. However, for a person who is disabled, irrespective of social background, it’s a definite setback. Though disability has no gender bias, women are the most affected by disability as the incidence of burden of taking care of day to day needs of a disabled generally falls on a mother, sister or wife. Further, though, the concept of critical period of development and neuroplasticitywas well established in medical and neurological science, there was no established mechanism to put it into practice to check disability. The Critical period of development, refers to a specific time during which the environment has its greatest impact on an individual’s development. Neuroplasticity refers to changes in neural pathways (nerves and or brain) and synapses (connections) which are due to changes in behaviour, environment and neural process. Brain is most malleable and formative during the first three years. By 3 years, a child's brain is about the size of adult brain. However, for a child to learn and develop properly the extent and type of environmental stimulation the child receives in infancy and childhood is a decisive factor. In case of a child having definite symptoms of disability, failure of an early identification of symptoms would result in loss of precious infant years, most suitable for intervention, as per principle of neuroplasticity and critical period of development, thereby, reducing the efficacy of intervention in future. Before Samarpan, there was no mechanism to put these scientific principles in practical administration to intervene through identification and intervention in delays and disability.

B. Strategic Approach

 2. What was the solution?
The policy gap was first identified in 2010 by Mr. Nishant Warwade, District Collector of Hoshangabad District, Madhaya Pradesh. For developing a blueprint for intervention,a National Level seminar on early treatment and rehabilitation in disability was organised in Hoshangabad in August, 2010. Experts from various institutes such as, National Institute of Mental Handicapped(NIMH); National Institute for Visually Handicapped (NIVH);National Institute of Mental Health and Neurological sciences(NIMHANS); National Institute of Orthopedic Handicapped(NIOH); National Centre for Disability studies (NCDS) at Indira Gandhi National Open University(IGNOU); National Trust, New Delhi; Composite Rehabilitation Centre for persons with disabilities(CRC), Bhopaldeliberated and paved the way for making the technical roadmap of Samarpan. Post seminar discussions between Mr. Warwade and his team from District administration Hoshangabad along with the experts from Department of Neo Natalogy, IGPEMR, Kolkata, laid down the foundation of Samarpan initiative. Convergence model was developed by the Collector laying down the role of every department. Non-government agencies were also taken into consideration in overall design of things. The main objectives were:  Understand the concept of early identification & intervention of development delays  Undertake suo motto identification of early signs of delays in U-5 children in the district, en masse, by conducting screening test based on developmental milestones for early identification of development impediments in newborn and U-5 children  Conduct a comprehensive specialized and multi-disciplinary evaluation of children for social development, visual development, speech and hearing development, mental development, normal development growth  Provide comprehensive and specialised intervention to remove or reduce developmental impediments  Facilitate acceptance in the family about onset of development delay in the infant along with striving to make society aware about the concept of EIC  Increase acceptability of disability in society and to involve it in society-based and home-based identification Samarpan (EIC) initiative works on the bedrock of screening by which possible cases of development delay or disability are identified in all U5 children registered in ICDS of a district. A screening tool named as Samarpan Screening Test (SST) was developed by adopting the screening test designed by National Institute for Mentally Handicapped (NIMH), Secunderabad, under their Reaching and Programming for Identification of Disabilities (RAPID) programme. The screening tool enumerates a set of simple activities which can be carried out by grass root level workers (such as Anganwadi Workers and Accredited Social Health Activists) of development milestones. Samarpan developed a comprehensive multi-disciplinary approach to interventions bringing various specialist under the existing set-up of the District Disability Rehabilitation Centre (DDRC). The children were screened at the DDRC by the experts and the identified children were then advised specialised intervention with training given to their care-givers, for ensuring that home-based interventions were also provided. Encouraged by the success of Samarpan in Hoshangabad, Mr. Warwade took the program forward in Bhopal, state capital of Madhya Pradesh, which is essentially an urban district with Samarpan Plus learning from the experiences of Samarpan. Since its initiation in 2010 and six rounds of Samarpan SST have been conducted on about 600,000 plus U5 children registered in ICDS in the district Bhopal and Hoshangabad till August, 2014, 14448 U5 children have been comprehensively examined at Samarpan EIC out of which 6412 U5 children were identified as true positive. The initiative successfully addressed the policy gap when Samarpan EIC concept was upscaled when Rashtriya Bal Swasthya Karyakram was finally launched under NRHM in February, 2013 for early detection of health conditions in children as a national policy by Government of India. Samarpan Hoshangabad has been recognized as nodal referral centre for central India by Ministry of Health & Family Welfare, GoI.

 3. How did the initiative solve the problem and improve people’s lives?
Samarpan initiated a paradigm shift in thinking about health interventions by shifting the focus from mortality to quality of life taking the focus beyond the yardstick of IMR. Early Intervention Clinic Samarpan is the inaugral model in the country demonstrating early identification, intervention & treatment programme for all U5 children registered in Integrated Children Development service(ICDS) in district Hoshangabad/Bhopal with developmental delay/ disability/ disease by converging the resources of Govt. department(s) such as, social justice; women & child development; health & family welfare; public relations; revenue ; Neo Natalogy department IPGMER and Institutions like, Red Cross , Rotary. It demonstrates the efficacy of intersectoral, interdepartmental and inter institutional convergence model optimizing resources. The most critical innovation is bringing the twin concept of Critical Development period and Neuro-plasticity on the policy agenda for the first time. The ‘Samarpan’ initiative of Hoshangabad has served as a pilot to the national policy on issues of child disability and specialised intervention. Samarpan by virtue of is proactive approach brought the diagnosis and treatment of disability within the reach of most marginalised and vulnerable sections of society who are left out of the ambit of treatment due to lack of resources.

C. Execution and Implementation

 4. In which ways is the initiative creative and innovative?
The ideation seminar organised for developing a blueprint for intervention resulted in series of meetings with partners in action like Dr. Arun Singh (IPGMER). Dr. Arun Singh, former Head, Department of Neonatology, IPGMER provided guidance in designing technical support on facility-based protocols and later training of specialists of the Samarpan facility at IPGMER. The screening test for community level application- Reaching and Programming for Identification of Disabilities (RAPID) which has been developed by NIHM. Identification of nodal officers from ICDS (Women and Child Development), District Rehabilitation Centre (Social Justice Department) District Hospital (Health Department) and District Disability Rehabilitation Centre (DDRC) was carried out. In a series of meetings at the district level convergence model for facilitating implementation was worked out. A lot of stress was given to awareness generation, and Information Education and Communication (IEC activities). Various tools such as nukkadnatak, Wall paintings related to disability in strategic locations, duggipitnapamphlets and advertisements were used to sensitise community. Panchayat secretaries, Ashas and AWWs were trained and were encouraged to spread consciousness through word of mouth. The societal reluctance towards bringing their children to DDRC and resistance within family to accept possibility of disability in their child led to renaming DDRC with a more positive sounding name Samarpan. The groundwork before implementation required activities such as:  Contextualizing RAPID to local needs and develop Samarpan Screening Test.  Doctors, Anaganwadi Workers (AWW), Accredited Social Health Activists (ASHA) were sensitised about disability.  Preparing training material and literature for the surveyors – AWWs and ASHAs.  AWWs were then trained accordingly on conducting the survey.  AWWs conducted door to door survey, suo- motte and en-masse for identifying children with development delays.  Identifying the children in the entire district showing signs of delayed development through a screening test. Simultaneously, the strengthening of infrastructure was carried out by improving the facilities in existing District Disability Rehabilitation Centre and by procurement of essential equipment. The facility was equipped to provide services such as the neurological assessment, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, psychological Services like DSCII & DDST, cognitive development for socialization, vison, speech and language and hearing. A Screening test was conducted by the AWWs and ASHAs en-masse and suo-motto to identify children with development delays The identified potential cases were registered at the facility with details entered in the system. The software ensured smooth monitoring as the details of facility functioning could be assessed by the supervisors at click of a button. The next step was to bring these identified cases to the facility to conduct specialised diagnoses by specialists and suggest intervention. In order to facilitate the children and their parents, Transportation facilities for children and their parents were also arranged.A route chart was prepared according to the capacity of the facility to screen children for investigation in one day, and accordingly, AWWs were informed. The identified children were then suggested for specialised intervention with training given to their care-givers, often mothers and the AWWs for ensuring that home-based interventions are provided. The figure 1 gives details of the process flow at the facility.

 5. Who implemented the initiative and what is the size of the population affected by this initiative?
The initiative was conceptualised by the then district collector of Hoshangabad District, Mr. Nishant Warwade along with his team of officials in District administration as well as officers from various departments such as Integrated Child Development Services, Women and Child Development, Department of Social Justice, National Rural Health Mission, District Disability Rehabilitation Centre, Department of Public Relations, Department of Rural Development and Department of Education. Apart from the officials of Hoshangabad & later in Bhopal district, the initiative developed and evolved significantly as a result of the participants of the national level seminar held. More specifically, Dr. Arun Singh, former Head, Department of Neonatology, IPGMER provided guidance in designing technical support on facility-based protocols and later training of specialists of the ‘Samarpan’ facility at IPGMER. Dr Amita Chand of NIPI-UNOPS supported Samarpan throughout. As many as 6000 grass roots level government functionaries such as the village level Anganwadi workers and Accredited social health activist formed the backbone of the program along with the parents of the children who participate in the screening tests for identification and those who participate in the long drawn process of intervention. The Red Cross Society financed the development of ‘Samarpan’ software. The State Bank of India donated a bus to Samarpan facility for picking and dropping children from their CSR fund. The Rotary chapter contributed by arranging for food & beverages for suspected cases and their families and workers at the district facility.
 6. How was the strategy implemented and what resources were mobilized?
Since the initiative was an inaugural effort on part of the district administration, there was no clear budget assigned for it. The implementation heavily depended on the convergence of available funds from various departments such as the District Women and Child Development Department, the District Health department, the District Disability Rehabilitation Centre, the Social Justice Department. Some private entities also assisted in small measures. Convergence with NRHM also aided the implementation. The Red Cross Society financed the development of Samarpan software. The State Bank of India donated a bus to Samarpan facility for picking and dropping children from their Corporate Social Responsibility fund. Similarly, UNDP-NIPI financially assisted in developing the Samarpan facility at DDRC in Hoshangabad. The Samarpan Centre at Hoshangabad required one time investment in infrastructure, machine, and equipment such as EIC equipments ,furniture, computers & printers, fax , photo copy machine, AC & Interior, LCD with DVD, Raw Material for P&OE, EIC Software, Play therapy Hall, BERA Electrode, web cam & camera, Sound proofing etc. and provision for recurring expenditure for salary of Administrative Officer and Physiotherapist, Psychologist, Audiologist/Ear Mould Technician., Speech Therapist, Optometrist, P&OE Technician, Mobility Instructor, MRW, Accountant, Counselor, ANMs, Peon ,Night Guard, Cleaner , Training for Staff, Training for ASHA &Anganwadi Workers , electricity bill, printing of formats etc. In all, the recurring component of the initiative is approx. INR ~ 2 million and one time establishing component is approx. INR 8 million. In terms of human resources, personnel of department(s) of Women and Child development; Health & family welfare; Social justice and Revenue roughly numbering about 6000 were involved to roll out the initiative. Financial resources were mobilized primarily from the allocated budget of the line department(s). The unspent allocation under disabled funds which every district collector has for his disposal was also harnessed. Activities which were not a mandate of any of the concerned department were taken care off by agencies such as Red Cross and Rotary. The initiative was also marginally aided by NIPI-UNOPS financially, towards one time establishment cost. Human resources were mobilized by the district administration under the leadership of collector. Various line departments were asked to align their human resources as per the plan developed on mandate. Often neglected resource of time was effectively harnessed all through the initiative.

 7. Who were the stakeholders involved in the design of the initiative and in its implementation?
1. Universal screening has led to early detection of early diseases and disability, resulting in timely intervention and a reduction in morbidity and lifelong disability. Dividends of early intervention not only enhance the improvement of survival outcome but also results in reduction of mal-nutritional prevalence, enhancing community development and educational attainment and overall improvement of quality of life. After initiation in 2010 and six rounds of Samarpan SST on about 6 lakh plus U5 children registered in ICDS in the district Bhopal and Hoshangabad till August, 2014, 14448 U5 children have been comprehensively examined at Samarpan out of which 6412 U5 children were identified as true positive. Out of these, 6412 U5 children have been identified as having one or more than one type of developmental delay, deficiency or disability. 2. Samarpan initiative has thus facilitated direct policy intervention at national level where there was a huge policy gap. Because of Samarpan 270 million children are getting screenedall acrossIndia. 3. Samarpan initiative has increased awareness on disability, delays & disease and early identification and intervention in Government functionaries and in society. The increase in capacity of Government human resource available at all 3 tiers -district, block and grass roots through tailor made capacity building programme is an evident benefit. Effective implementation of scientific concept(s) of critical period and Neuro plasticity by a practical and robust mechanism, resulting in early identification of U5 children having one or more confirm sign of onset of disability and their consequent intervention is a significant achievement . 4. In addition, home based intervention, awareness and capacity building has been carried out for concerned AWW and parents. Better utilization of Government resources resulting in their optimum use, in particular the often neglected resource of time through interdepartmental, intersectoral and inter institutional frame work is a key benefit. Last but not the least, the change in mode of Government service provider/department(s) from one of demand based to that of suomotu reaching out to societyby screening all U5 children for possible signs of disability is a paradigm shift and is a significant benefit arising out of initiative. 5. Samarpan centres provide multi-disciplinary evaluation and treatment by experts of different fields under a single roof in a single, dedicated building. Further, Tertiary linkages for domain specific services have also been established for comprehensive interventions.

 8. What were the most successful outputs and why was the initiative effective?
Dedicated meetings were conducted at block level once in a month and at the district level twice a month. In the three departments- department of health, Women and child development and social justice- nodal persons were identified and given the responsibility for interim course correction to address the day-to day challenges. The initiative had an in-built mechanism of monitoring as the entire process was digitised. Once a suspected case was caught in the net by preliminary screening, the details of child and their assessment by experts for development delays in all possible domain , along with their comments and diagnosis were fed into Samarpan software that was specially designed in order to store case specifics such as, parental history, detailed birth history of the baby, developmental assessment, and assessment of hearing and visual functions, intervention strategy, and periodic evaluation. The identified potential cases were registered at the facility with details entered in the system. The software ensured smooth monitoring as the details of facility functioning could be assessed by the supervisors at click of a button.

 9. What were the main obstacles encountered and how were they overcome?
The main obstacles encountered while evolving Samarpan were acute resource gaps in terms of knowledge, finance and Human resources. In human resources, there was a gap in technical, managerial and field level trained personnel. There was obscurity about concept of early identification of disability and principle of neuroplasticity and critical period of development both in society and in governmental setup. An essential need to roll Samarpan out through convergence of more than one Government department(s) and Institutions, including NGOs , due to overlapping of mandates was felt.Negative mind set of departments to defend their so called “turf”; the serious gap in knowhow and knowledge of procedures; non-availability latest machines and equipments; Logistical gap such as transportation etc.; lack of monitoring and evaluation; question of increasing the net; miscellaneous impediments were other challenges. Planning was carried out after many a brainstorming sessions by the administration under the then collector. It was decided that to overcome the ignorance and lack of knowledge of disability in general and early identification and intervention in particular, through National level a seminar of leading experts on the topic in Hoshangabad. IEC programme for society were then launched to create awareness in society. The overlapping nature of objectives of Samarpan necessitated evolving a convergence model involving departments such as Social Welfare, Women and Child Development, Health. A well thought of convergence model was development keeping in mind the resources and mandate of Government departments as well as other institutions. The gap in technical manpower, machines and equipment was sought to be filled by recruiting suitable professionals as well as procuring state of the art machines by pooling financial resources of Social justice and Health.Poor monitoring and evaluation was overcome by taking regular and focused meeting of all concerned.

D. Impact and Sustainability

 10. What were the key benefits resulting from this initiative?
1. After initiation in 2010 and six rounds of Samarpan SST on about 600000 plus U5 children registered in ICDS in the district Bhopal and Hoshangabad till August, 2014, 14448 U5 children have been comprehensively examined at Samarpan out of which 6412 U5 children were identified as true positive. These children were screened by Anganwadi Workers using Samarpan Screening Test and 6412 U5 children have been identified as having one or more than one type of developmental delay, deficiency or disability. The impact of Samarpan is most visible in such Positive cases of delay, deficiency, disability, disease in U5 children who were identified by grass root level worker through their enhanced capacity of carrying out the screening test. 2. Samarpan centres provide multi-disciplinary evaluation and treatment by experts of different fields under a single roof in a single, dedicated building. Apart from screening more than six hundred thousand U5 children, registered in Anganwadi Centres and screening of ‘high risk’ new-born children in district Hoshangabad/Bhopal, following services are being provided at Samarpan centres: I. Medical services-for diagnostic or evaluation purposes II. Dental services III. Occupational therapy-services that relate to self-help skills, adaptive behaviour and play, and sensory, motor, and postural development. IV. Physical therapy - services to prevent or lessen movement’s difficulties and related functional problems. V. Psychological services VI. Audiology - identifying and providing services for children with hearing loss among children from birth to 6 years for both congenital deafness and also acquired deafness. VII. Speech-language pathology - services for children with delay in communication skills or with motor skills. VIII. Vision services IX. Health services. X. Nutrition services - XI. Social work services - preparing an assessment of the social and emotional strengths and needs of a child and family, such as counseling. XII. Special instruction - designing learning environments and activities that promote the child’s development. Tertiary linkages for domain specific services have also been established for comprehensive intervention. 3. Based on Samarpan Hoshangabad model, In March 2013, Ministry of Family Welfare & Health, Govt. of India launched RasthriyaBalSurakshaKaryakram (RBSK), a child health screening and early intervention programme to provide comprehensive care to all the children in the community. The screening and early intervention services is expected to cover more than 30 identified health conditions for early detection, free treatment and management through dedicated teams all across the country. District early intervention centres, based on Samarpan Hoshangabad, are planned to be set up as first referral point for further investigation for treatment and management. RBSK focuses on effective health intervention, which intends to reduce both direct cost and out of pocket expenditure as also reducing the extent of disability and improving the quality of life and enabling all persons to achieve their full potential. It focusses on not only new born and those attending Anganwadi Centre but also school going children and will ultimately benefit more than 27 crore children in the country. The model is being replicated in 676 districts across the country. Samarpaninitiative has thus facilitated direct policy intervention at national level where there was a huge policy gap. Additionally, provision of comprehensive child health care will also provide country-wide epidemiological data on various diseases of children for future planning of area-specific services. 4. Samarpan Hoshangabad has been recognized as nodal referral centre for central India by Ministry of Health & Family Welfare, GoI. 5. Samarpan initiative has increased awareness on disability, delays & disease and early identification and intervention in Government functionaries and in society. Theincrease in capacity of Government human resource available at all 3 tiers -district, block and grass root through tailor made capacity building programme is an evident benefit. 6. As many as 6000 plus grass root level workers and other personnel involved in the initiative have undergone capacity building programmes, were optimally used Better utilization of Government resources resulting in their optimum use, in particular the often neglected resource of time. 7. Samarpan is a paradigm shift in public service delivery from demand-driven to suo-motto reaching out to the society by screening all U5 children from mortality to overall enhancing the quality of life.

 11. Did the initiative improve integrity and/or accountability in public service? (If applicable)
The success of Samarpan lies in its sustainable robust mechanisms. If looked closely, Samarpan works on taking bits and pieces of mandates of all concerned line departments and integrates them by its work flow process. This means that budgetary allocations of department alone is required to sustain the initiative. The activities of Samarpan which were not a mandate of line department such as providing food and beverages to positive cases and their parents and AWW etc. is being taken care off by NGOs. Thus Samarpan is sustainable as department of Women and child development would keep on screening the U5 children registered in AWCs as they have been trained and as it is their mandate; Health department would keep on providing manpower and associated support as its their mandate and Social justice department would keep on its rolls the essential paramedics and proving intervention such as hearing aid, calipers physiotherapy etc. as it is their mandate to do so. The associated activities also would be taken care off by responsible agency to whom a particular activity has been allocated. An initial, one time investment is required to begin the initiative but hitherto unutilized funds of Social justice- which every collector of district is authorized by the Govt. to use it, can be utilized as it was done in district Hoshangabad. On the social front, due to enhanced awareness of society, the demand for services has increased. This also contributes to sustainability as demand of service often acts as a check on Govt service providers. As disability makes no distinction of caste, creed, race or religion, its awareness has resulted in people from all walks of life participate and take corrective action through Samarpan-DDRC Dependence on each other and strong hand holding given by then collector has resulted in Samarpan being a priority of the administration and thus of concerned department(s). Media advocacy and its keen interest also provide for further cementing the institutional arrangement. In March 2013, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, GoI under NRHM, launched Rashtriya Bal Suraksha Karyakram(RBSK), a child health screening and intervention programme to provide comprehensive care to all the children in the community. The objective of this initiative was to improve the overall quality of the children through early detection of birth defects, deficiencies, developmental delays and disabilities. With the launch of RBSK, the initiative is replicated in the entire country which will eventually benefit 270 million U5 and U 18 children of the nation.

 12. Were special measures put in place to ensure that the initiative benefits women and girls and improves the situation of the poorest and most vulnerable? (If applicable)
The journey of Samarpan is a source of continuous learning experience for public administration and policy in India on health and disability. The concept of convergence is challenging to implement. The attitude of departments to play alone was a serious challenge but once overcome, it becomes a powerful strength. The infinite capacity of lowest level government functionaries – the Anganwadi workers (AWWs) and Accredited social Health Activist (ASHAs) to learn a new concept vindicates the fact that capacity of human resource can be increased if proper training is imparted to them. Regular monitoring and evaluation, often a weak component in government functioning is an important ingredient for success of any initiative or programme. In order to make an initiative successful, it is imperative to have it driven by and owned by people. This result is generation of demand of particular services as awareness increases. Constructive criticism and role of media is equally important for institution to foster themselves as standard of public service delivery requires constant appraisal. Rehabilitation of disability is a vast field, ever expanding with intervention of new technology and it is indeed a challenge to provide for. Institutionalization of model requires time and thus a proper hand holding support is required in incipient stage. Lastly, whenever overlapping of mandate happens, success can only be achieved through inter-departmental, inter-sectoral and inter-institutional convergence through some centralized office which can take its leadership and ownership. One of the key elements which have made Samarpan a success was enhancement of knowledge base by experts through a national level seminar which laid a firm foundation for planning of activities. The planning of Samarpan based on convergence, in which role, responsibility and decision on common use of resources of all concerned departments and institutes was thoughtfully incorporated made for evolving a robust, sustainable model. The tailor made capacity building programme, implemented for all concerned departments jointly at district and block level was instrumental for success. It resulted in increase of motivation and confidence of AWWs and ASHAs. The collector himself took as many as 8 training sessions of AWWs and ASHAs, totalling 3000+ in district who in turn executed Samarpan screening test on more than 100 thousand + U5 children enrolled in AWCs (and continues to do so).It is pertinent to mention it here that AWWs and ASHAs are essentially women and therefore the increase in confidence also vicariously contributed in women empowerment. Effective monitoring and evaluation through regular, focused meeting both at district and block level by the collector in a non-threatening environment where everyone was encouraged to speak openly resulted in identification of bottlenecks and facilitated local level solutions. The coordinating role by the then collector and his facilitation of Samarpan to became an institution in itself by assigning priority to it by the district administration Hoshangabad and by providing leadership contributed immensely to success of initiative.

Contact Information

Institution Name:   District Administration
Institution Type:   Government Agency  
Contact Person:   Nishant Warwade
Title:   Collector  
Telephone/ Fax:   91-755-2540494
Institution's / Project's Website:  
E-mail:   nishantias@gmail.com  
Address:   Collector Office,old Secretariat,
Postal Code:   462001
City:   Bhopal
State/Province:   MP
Country:  

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